You don’t want your privacy: Disney and the meat space data race

http://lisnews.org/you_don_t_want_your_privacy_disney_and_the_meat_space_data_race

http://gigaom.com/2014/01/18/you-dont-want-your-privacy-disney-and-the-meat-space-data-race/

We’re all wringing our hands over the NSA, and meanwhile we’re handing our data as fast as we can to other entities for next to nothing. If the NSA were smart, it would buy Candy Crush Saga, change the permissions, and be done with it.

If we’re honest, we give privacy lip service, but we vote with our keypresses and our dollars, and the bands we strap to our wrists.

Expect your future meat space world to feel very much like your cyber space one. The next time your RFID tag lets Mickey know you’ve got diarrhea, maybe the stall door can make suggestions to you: “Customers who got funnel cake diarrhea also bought Maalox.”

[Thanks Elaine!]

Lemony Snicket: "Librarians have suffered enough"

http://lisnews.org/lemony_snicket_librarians_have_suffered_enough

Children's author, who has himself been 'falsely accused of crimes' wants to honour those who have stood up to pressure from would-be book banners.
"Librarians have suffered enough", according to Lemony Snicket, who is setting up a new annual US prize "honouring a librarian who has faced adversity with integrity and dignity intact".

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/jan/31/lemony-snicket-prize-librarians-book-bans

Amazon’s latest page-turner: book publishing

http://lisnews.org/amazon_s_latest_pageturner_book_publishing

http://seattletimes.com/html/businesstechnology/2022840140_amazonpublishingxml.html

After forever changing book-selling, Amazon is now embarked on a wide-ranging venture that seeks to alter the book-publishing end of the business. Company officials see it as an experiment where they can tinker with new ways to connect authors and readers.

Melvil Dewey, the Weirdo Father of Librarianship

http://lisnews.org/melvil_dewey_the_weirdo_father_of_librarianship_0

From Bitch Magazine:
It's no secret that most librarians are women (according to 2002 US Statistical Abstract figures, 82% of librarians in the US are women). But not everyone knows the story behind female librarianship in the states. Today we'll take a look at Melvil Dewey, who is accredited with having made library science such a popular career for women.

Melvil Dewey, creator of the Dewey Decimal System (as well as co-founder of the American Library Journal and the American Library Association), is often praised for having created a field of jobs for women in the US. In 1883, Dewey was hired as the head librarian at Columbia College (which later turned into Columbia University), and he soon convinced the trustees to let him open a library school. At the time, Columbia College only allowed women into a special women's college, so Dewey's plans to invite women to join the library school were controversial. His first class was comprised of 20 people, 17 of whom were women. While many have focused on Dewey's success in educating and opening up jobs for women, attention is rarely paid to why he felt women would make great librarians. Spoiler alert: he held some pretty sexist beliefs.

In The Feminization of Libraranship, Tawny Sverdlin asks whether Dewey's opening up the library school for women was actually the achievement that it seems:

The opportunity for women to enter library school at Columbia College...proved to be a double-edged sword in terms of women's opportunity for advancement. Melvil Dewey championed women as librarians and library school educators but placed caps on their achievement in terms of gender straight away. According to Dewey's blatant double standard, women had to demonstrate truly remarkable ability or be relegated to perpetual underling status.

Notably, many students in the first class at Columbia dropped out because of his strict and eccentric teaching style. Keeping in mind that Dewey was known to grope and try to kiss female colleagues, you have to wonder why so many of his initial students quit. Dewey's "scandalous behavior" and "his persistent inability to control himself around women" was cited in a biography called Irrepressible reformer: a biography of Melvil Dewey.

Furthermore, a major reason Dewey wanted women to enter the field was because he felt women were ideal for the repetitiveness of library work and "didn't cause trouble."

Dewey frequently came into conflict with colleagues and officials. Due to blatant racism, anti-Semitism, and sexual misconduct, he was forced to resigned from several prominent positions. A group of Library school alumnae and women from the American Library Association threatened to bring a vote of censure against Dewey because he had sexually harassed women at ALA conferences. In 1906, they kicked him out of active ALA participation. Those are the kind of librarians that should go down in history, right? s no secret that most librarians are women (according to 2002 US Statistical Abstract figures, 82% of librarians in the US are women). But not everyone knows the story behind female librarianship in the states. Today we'll take a look at Melvil Dewey, who is accredited with having made library science such a popular career for
woman.

Melvil Dewey, the Weirdo Father of Librarianship

http://lisnews.org/melvil_dewey_the_weirdo_father_of_librarianship

From Bitch Magazine:
It's no secret that most librarians are women (according to 2002 US Statistical Abstract figures, 82% of librarians in the US are women). But not everyone knows the story behind female librarianship in the states. Today we'll take a look at Melvil Dewey, who is accredited with having made library science such a popular career for women.

Melvil Dewey, creator of the Dewey Decimal System (as well as co-founder of the American Library Journal and the American Library Association), is often praised for having created a field of jobs for women in the US. In 1883, Dewey was hired as the head librarian at Columbia College (which later turned into Columbia University), and he soon convinced the trustees to let him open a library school. At the time, Columbia College only allowed women into a special women's college, so Dewey's plans to invite women to join the library school were controversial. His first class was comprised of 20 people, 17 of whom were women. While many have focused on Dewey's success in educating and opening up jobs for women, attention is rarely paid to why he felt women would make great librarians. Spoiler alert: he held some pretty sexist beliefs.

In The Feminization of Libraranship, Tawny Sverdlin asks whether Dewey's opening up the library school for women was actually the achievement that it seems:

The opportunity for women to enter library school at Columbia College...proved to be a double-edged sword in terms of women's opportunity for advancement. Melvil Dewey championed women as librarians and library school educators but placed caps on their achievement in terms of gender straight away. According to Dewey's blatant double standard, women had to demonstrate truly remarkable ability or be relegated to perpetual underling status.

Notably, many students in the first class at Columbia dropped out because of his strict and eccentric teaching style. Keeping in mind that Dewey was known to grope and try to kiss female colleagues, you have to wonder why so many of his initial students quit. Dewey's "scandalous behavior" and "his persistent inability to control himself around women" was cited in a biography called Irrepressible reformer: a biography of Melvil Dewey.

Furthermore, a major reason Dewey wanted women to enter the field was because he felt women were ideal for the repetitiveness of library work and "didn't cause trouble."

Dewey frequently came into conflict with colleagues and officials. Due to blatant racism, anti-Semitism, and sexual misconduct, he was forced to resigned from several prominent positions. A group of Library school alumnae and women from the American Library Association threatened to bring a vote of censure against Dewey because he had sexually harassed women at ALA conferences. In 1906, they kicked him out of active ALA participation. Those are the kind of librarians that should go down in history, right? s no secret that most librarians are women (according to 2002 US Statistical Abstract figures, 82% of librarians in the US are women). But not everyone knows the story behind female librarianship in the states. Today we'll take a look at Melvil Dewey, who is accredited with having made library science such a popular career for
woman.

Literary Twitter’s Best Tweets

http://lisnews.org/literary_twitter_s_best_tweets

So, to present literary Twitter in its best possible light, we are returning again to those most widely followed on literary Twitter, but this time, looking at which Tweets got the most favorites, we are highlighting each literary Twitterer’s best tweet. Here you’ll find much wry humor, gossip, lots of politics, Margaret Atwood flirting with a Twitter-famous comedian, and even a surprising amount of insight crammed into 140 characters. They may be enough to win over some fresh converts.
http://www.themillions.com/2014/02/oh-the-favorites-youll-give-literary-twitters-best-tweets...

Toronto libraries flooded with requests for 'Crazy Town: The Rob Ford Story'

http://lisnews.org/toronto_libraries_flooded_with_requests_for_crazy_town_the_rob_ford_story

The Toronto Public Library had received just shy of 500 hold requests for Crazy Town before the book became available Monday afternoon.

Talk about demand. With that many requests, considering the library's 21-day borrowing policy, it would take 10,500 days (or more than 28 years) for everyone with a current hold request to get their hands on a single copy of Crazy Town. Thankfully for them, the Toronto Public Library has ordered 145 copies, which would cut the best-case waiting period down to about 72 days.

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/blogs/dailybrew/toronto-libraries-inundated-demand-crazy-town-rob-f...

Adobe to Require New Epub DRM in July, Expects to Abandon Existing Users

http://lisnews.org/adobe_to_require_new_epub_drm_in_july_expects_to_abandon_existing_users

The tl;dr version is that Adobe is going to start pushing for ebook vendors to provide support for the new DRM in March, and when July rolls Adobe is going to force the ebook vendors to stop supporting the older DRM. (Hadrien Gardeur, Paul Durrant, and Martyn Daniels concur on this interpretation.)

This means that any app or device which still uses the older Adobe DRM will be cut off. Luckily for many users, that penalty probably will not affect readers who use Kobo or Google reading apps or devices; to the best of my knowledge neither uses the Adobe DRM internally. And of course Kindle and Apple customers won’t even notice, thanks to those companies’ wise decision to use their own DRM.

http://www.the-digital-reader.com/2014/02/03/adobe-require-new-epub-drm-july-expects-abandon...

Guns @ Your Library

http://lisnews.org/guns_your_library

This story from the Seattle Public Library is a bit dated, but worth reading.

When Seattle Public Library lifted its ban on guns in early November, officials there said they had done so because patrons had complained.

Internal library emails reveal that there was just one patron complaint in several years – a man with a Yahoo email account who didn’t identify himself as either a patron or Seattle resident.

That man, Dave Bowman, lives in Seattle and has a library card (which he uses, he noted in an email to KUOW), and said that he demanded the policy change on behalf of all gun owners. He described himself as “neither a conservative, nor liberal, but a libertarian.”

“I noticed one day that the library’s rules stated that firearms were not allowed on library property except by law enforcement,” Bowman said by email to KUOW. “I knew this rule was in violation of state law (and common sense) and brought it to their attention.”

Joe Fithian, the head of security for the library, replied to Bowman: “Much the same as eating and sleeping or being intoxicated are not against the law, (guns) are against our rules of conduct.”

But Bowman refused to back down and within two months, the library announced to its staff that it would drop the gun ban. Staff members could ask questions, but administrators were firm: On Nov. 4, the library would allow guns.

Do you allow guns at your library? Are there specific restrictions? Please comment below.